the spirit of paris
Celebrates the blues

Grévin’s magic is made up of improbable encounters, those that took place and those that did not. You could sit next to Jean d’Ormesson, in a literary café, having a drink in the company of Marguerite Yourcenar, the first woman to be elected to the French Academy and to wear the famous green habit, who introduced him to his peers when he became a member.

Paris, the Capital of fashion.  Where you can also meet, for example, Jean-Paul Gaultier or Christian Dior. This figure was created with the help of his sister Catherine, who inspired the Miss Dior perfume.  Nearby, Naomi Campbell on the runway.

 Do you like the Opera?  You will love Cecilia Bartoli.  She is wearing the costume designed by Agostino Cavalca for her recital of the works written for the castrati, Sacrificium.  Or meet Roberto Alagna, Luciano Pavarotti and don’t forget Maria Callas.

 The Hall of Columns, a Baroque sculptured setting, rosewood panelling, ornamented in gilt and marble. The vaulted ceiling is supported by 12 columns with bronze capitals.  Five sculptures of women representing the five continents look down from each bay.
 
The Dome, a masterpiece of Venetian mosaic, shades of blue on a gold background, is adorned with busts of Michelangelo, Benvenuto Cellini, Germain Pilon and Jean Goujon.  The four recumbent women over the arches represent the four seasons and the balconies house Pierrot, Columbine and Pulcinella of the Commedia dell’Arte.  Standing out left and right, the ship in the Paris coat of arms.
Only these two rooms (The Hall of Columns & The Dome) existed when the Grévin opened on June 5, 1882.

 The Grévin Theatre, is a gem of an Italian style theatre, built by the architect Rives in 1900.  Antoine Bourdelle signed the high relief and sculptures. Jules Chéret was the author of the backdrop, an original painting, 5m by 5m, depicting the characters in the Commedia dell’Arte in a joyful farandole dance.  The Theatre was listed on the Inventory of Historical Monuments in 1964 by André Malraux.  As your visit ends, you enter the Dome and the Hall of Columns, a decor created for the Grévin in 1882 by the architect Esnault Pelterie, on the site of the Café de Mulhouse.